ASUW :: Associated Students of the University of Washington

Major: Economics and Political Science; Minor in International Studies
Class Standing: Senior
Hometown: Mongolia


Quote:
“Where I come from, Mongolia, our country is a developing country and we have a lot of issues there. We have a lot homeless people around our city, and I felt like I should try to help them. So I would give them the small amounts of change I had. But as I grew up, I realized that small change won’t change their lives, so I decided we need to make systemic change. Then I thought I’ll go into economics and develop the economy so that everyone can get an equal opportunity.”


What are you involved in on campus and how are these organizations meaningful to you?
“I got involved in many different things. I don’t have just one community, I have communities everywhere. That way UW feels like a home. One community I got involved in is Unite UW. It’s a program that connects domestic students with international students. Even though UW is a big, diverse community, there is still a gap between domestic and international students. It collects applications, and then we have a quarter-long program where we do a lot of interesting stuff; we go to retreats, we visit great places. Through this we develop great relationships with everyone. At the end we don’t care if we’re domestic or international students. We have bonds with everyone. I’ve found so many great, inspirational people. On the retreat, we have a round table and we hear everyone’s unique story. So many of them are involved in so many things and so passionate about everything, and I thought, ‘Wow people are amazing! What have I been doing for my whole life’. Thanks to this program I decided to study abroad, I decided to get a job, I decided to get involved in research, I decided to start a club–so many things. I started Mongolian Student Association. Why I started that was because our community here is not that big. When I came to UW, what I realized is that our culture is not represented here a lot. So, that’s why I wanted to promote and share our culture with the UW community to show what Mongolia really is.”


What made you interested in your major?
“Where I come from, Mongolia, our country is a developing country and we have a lot of issues there. We have a lot homeless people around our city, and I felt like I should try to help them. So I would give them the small amounts of change I had. But as I grew up, I realized that small change won’t change their lives, so I decided we need to make systemic change. Then I thought I’ll go into economics and develop the economy so that everyone can get an equal opportunity.”


As a transfer student, how was your transition to UW?
“At first I thought I was all alone. I decided to work on my grades more than my social life. In fall quarter I took a statistics class and I was getting good grades, but I found out I failed the final exam…at the time I felt so bad, like I had anxiety or something, because I cared about grades a lot. But then I realized grades are not something to worry about; grades are just numbers. Then I decided to explore myself and get involved in many things so that I could find my community.”


What does a day in the life look like for you?
“I wake up, eat my breakfast and come to class. I don’t really spend my time alone in my room, so I try to spend as much time as I can on campus or outside exploring. So after class I try to stay at libraries or meet my club members or friends and come home really late.”


What advice would you give to incoming transfer or freshman students?
“Don’t worry about grades. Don’t worry about failure. The failure itself will help you to enhance your experience. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. UW is here to help you in every way possible.”